Millions of Brits are being forced to move back in with their parents after a break-up, as they simply can’t afford to live alone.

As many as 7.2m people – 14% of the adult population – have ended up back in the family home following the end of a relationship, new research has revealed.

More than half (55%) of those who had moved back in with their parents said they had done it for financial reasons, according to the study by Churchill Home Insurance.

Just over a third (37%) returned home for parental emotional support and 13% needed help with childcare.

Sometimes parents are exactly what we need to help us get through these difficult periods in our lives

Martin Scott, head of Churchill Home Insurance
An atom of type quote lives here

A quarter (25%) of those moving in with their parents did so after a bad break-up, needing distance or independence from their ex-partner.

The study found that men (16%) are more likely to move in with their parents than women (12%).

The main reason men move back in with their parents is for financial reasons (59%) while women view it more as a temporary measure while searching for a new place to live (54%).

Churchill advises people to check whether items in storage units are included in their home insurance policy. Image by Sean Locke Photography/Shutterstock.com

The financial reasons for people going back to their parents’ home include the cost of rents elsewhere (30%), the need to reduce cost of living (29%) and having to pay off debts (25%).

Martin Scott, head of Churchill Home Insurance, said: “A separation or divorce is an emotionally traumatic experience and sometimes parents are exactly what we need to help us get through these difficult periods in our lives.

“The additional financial strain of having to keep separate properties often means it’s easier to move in with family, rather than try and find somewhere else to live.” 

According to Churchill’s research, people spend an average of six months living with their parents after breaking up with a partner.

Men spend longer with their parents than women (six months compared to five) and people aged 18-35 spend the longest (7.5 months). 

More than two thirds of adults (68%) bring all their belongings with them to their parents’ house following a break up. 

Mr Scott added: “Anyone moving back in with their parents should ensure their parents’ home insurance policy is sufficient to cover their additional belongings, as well as anything belonging to visiting children, or items in a storage unit.

“If you don’t check with your insurance provider, you may find that you’re underinsured or even not insured at all.”