If something happened that stopped you being able to earn, you'd still have to make sure you were financially stable, wouldn't you? Well, not everybody thinks so.

In fact, 48% of Brits think someone other than them should be responsible for their financial stability.

According to a new report by HSBC, a third (33%) of people in the UK think that responsibility should lie with the government, 9% say it should be their family and 6% say their employer should be responsible.

Those figures are even higher in other parts of the world.

More than two thirds of people in China (77%), Argentina (70%) and the UAE (71%) say someone else should be responsible for their financial stability.

Americans are the most likely to take responsibility for themselves with only 46% saying it should be someone else.

For its report, titled Power of Protection Confidence in the Future, HSBC surveyed more than 11,000 people in 12 countries.

It’s the most natural feeling in the world to want to make sure you and your family are protected

Charlie Nunn, group head of wealth management, HSBC
An atom of type quote lives here

Overall, 60% of respondents said someone other than them should be responsible for their financial stability. Just over a quarter (26%) said it should be the state/government, 20% said family and 14% said their employer.

The study also revealed that 47% of people worry more about their long-term financial security than anything else.

69% of people in the UK said they couldn't manage well financially if something unforeseen happened to them. Image by d13/Shutterstock.com

Despite this, 49% said they could not manage well if something unforeseen happened to them. This number rises to 69% in the UK and France, and 74% in Argentina.

More than half (51%) of those who said they couldn't manage well financially said this is because they can’t afford to prepare for the unknown. 31% believe there is nothing they can do to prepare for the unknown and a further 18% say they haven’t thought about it.

Of those who are actively considering taking out insurance but have not yet done, 53% said cost-related issues are the main barrier.

They either expect or know the product to be too expensive. Other reasons for not taking out insurance include concerns about exclusions or pay-outs (38%), it not being a priority (31%) or relying on someone else to arrange it (20%).

Charlie Nunn, group head of wealth management at HSBC, said: “It’s the most natural feeling in the world to want to make sure you and your family are protected.

“By taking simple steps now, you can ensure you are better prepared to provide for the people who are important to you, whatever happens.”

HSBC’s tips to help people prepare for the future are to identify your biggest concerns, know your future aspirations, have an action plan and review it regularly.