The chief executive of Uber has apologised for “the mistakes we’ve made” and said the company will appeal the decision to remove its private hire licence in London.

In an open letter, Dara Khosrowshahi thanked drivers and customers, vowing to work with London authorities to “make things right”.

Uber’s London taxi licence expires on 30 September and Transport for London (TfL) last week announced it would not be renewed.

Announcing its decision, TfL said Uber was not “fit and proper” to hold a taxi licence in the capital.

“Uber’s approach and conduct demonstrate a lack of corporate responsibility in relation to a number of issues which have potential public safety and security implications,” said TfL in a statement.

Thousands of black cab drivers gathered in London earlier this year to protest against Uber working conditions

Concerns include Uber’s approach to reporting criminal offences, obtaining medical certificates and carrying out DBS (Disclosure and Barring Service) checks.

London mayor Sadiq Khan said he fully supported the decision, saying all companies in London “must play by the rules”.

“It would be wrong if TfL continued to license Uber if there is any way that this could pose a threat to Londoners’ safety and security,” he said on Friday.

We will appeal this decision on behalf of millions of Londoners, but we do so with the knowledge that we must also change

Dara Khosrowshahi, CEO, Uber
Atom 295 lives here

Mr Khosrowshahi has today responded in an open letter published in today’s Evening Standard and shared by Uber’s head of communications on Twitter.

He said: “While Uber has revolutionised the way people move in cities around the world, it’s equally true that we’ve got things wrong along the way.

“On behalf of everyone at Uber globally, I apologise for the mistakes we’ve made.

“We will appeal this decision on behalf of millions of Londoners, but we do so with the knowledge that we must also change.”

A petition to “Save your Uber in London” on Change.org has so far been signed by more than 750,000 people.

It accuses TfL and Mr Khan of giving in to “a small number of people who want to restrict consumer choice” and warns that more than 40,000 licensed drivers will be left out of work.